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Past Exhibitions 2014-2010

Click on the years below to explore past exhibitions at the Arkansas Arts Center. The project of making more past information available such as catalogs, images, and artist lists is a long-term goal of the Arkansas Arts Center. The information below will convey varying levels of completion. Check back here to find new information as it is made available. Currently, information for exhibitions prior to 2010 is in the following searchable pdf: Arkansas Arts Center Past Exhibitions 2009-1937

  • 2014

    • Mid-Southern Watercolorists: 45th Annual Juried Exhibition

      February 13, 2015 — April 12, 2015

      In its 45th year, the exhibition received 149 entries by 81 artists. Guest juror and nationally recognized watercolorist, Linda Baker, narrowed the entries down to the thirty works selected for the exhibition.

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    • HOW TO KILL: WORLD WAR II WATERCOLORS BY ROBERT ANDREW PARKER

      February 3, 2015 — March 8, 2015

      Robert Andrew Parker based a series of watercolors on poems by a young poet killed in action during World War II. The simplicity of the images invoke a kind of wistfulness that contrasts with the stern themes of separation and distance.

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    • Color, An Artist's Tale: Paintings by Virmarie DePoyster

      October 28, 2014 — February 15, 2015

      Writers use words to set a mood, describe and illustrate. As a visual artist, color is my silent narrative. Without words, the slightest color I observe holds information, molds my human experience and translates into my work.

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    • William Beckman: Drawings, 1967 - 2013

      October 24, 2014 — February 1, 2015

      William Beckman's gripping drawings came to the Arkansas Arts Center in the first major retrospective of this great realist artist's works on paper. Beckman is celebrated for the intimacy and emotional power of his drawings of the human figure.

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    • A Sense of Balance: The Sculpture of Stoney Lamar

      October 24, 2014 — January 18, 2015

      This exhibition of the sculpture of Stoney Lamar presents work from 1987 to the present. Uninspired by traditional turned wood vessel forms Stoney Lamar embarked on a personal exploration of the lathe and other tools of turners and woodworkers. This spirit of experimentation has firmly placed his work in the avant-garde of the wood turning world. Not only was he one of the first to use multi-axial turning, but eventually he added steel, color and distressed surface treatments.

      A Sense of Balance: The Sculpture of Stoney Lamar was organized by the Asheville Art Museum and guest curated by Andrew Glasgow. The exhibition, catalogue and national tour is made possible by the generous support of many individuals and foundations across the country.

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    • The 46th Collectors Show and Sale

      November 14, 2014 — January 4, 2015

      The Collectors Show and Sale is an annual Arkansas Arts Center tradition that brings the vibrant New York gallery scene to Little Rock.

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    • The Clinton Years: Political Cartoons by George Fisher

      November 9 — November 23, 2014

      Organized in celebration of the Clinton Presidential Library’s tenth anniversary, The Clinton Years: Political Cartoons by George Fisher featured work selected from the more than three thousand drawings contained in the Arts Center’s archive of the long-time Arkansas Gazette political cartoonist. The five cartoons viewed in the Lecture Hall Gallery date between 1985 and 1991 and illustrate Fisher’s unique ability to capture the pulse of the social and political climate of his day, and especially that surrounding Bill Clinton as he weighed his decision to pursue the office of the president of the United States.

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    • Poet in Copper: Engravings by Evan Lindquist

      September 5 — October 26, 2014

      Poet in Copper: Engravings by Evan Lindquist, mounted as part of ACANSA Arts Festival, was a celebration of the first Artist Laureate for the State of Arkansas. Evan Lindquist became a force in Arkansas graphic art during his forty years teaching printmaking and drawing at Arkansas State University until his retirement in 2003.

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    • Seeing the Forest

      August 12 — November 2, 2014

      Something primal links human beings with trees. Through the millennia, we have made houses out of boards, eaten fruit and nuts picked from trees, carved art and useful objects from wood, hunted woodland creatures, and sought refuge beneath spreading branches. Villages and forests are equal gathering places of life.

      Groves, woods, gardens, orchards and urban tree canopies have inspired many contemporary artists, as seen in the visual forest that sprung up in the Alice Pratt Brown Atrium. Making your way through other galleries, one encountered the myriad ways artists portrayed trees and human figures throughout the centuries.

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    • 12th NATIONAL DRAWING INVITATIONAL: OUTSIDE THE LINES

      July 18 — October 5, 2014

      Some of the greatest, most cutting-edge graphic artists in America have participated in a series of National Drawing Invitational exhibitions at the Arkansas Arts Center since 1986. In 2014 the Arts Center mounted the 12th NDI, which will included artists from the Mid-Atlantic region.

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    • 56th Annual Delta Exhibition

      June 27 — September 28, 2014

      The Delta Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture was founded in 1956 to feature contemporary work by artists from Arkansas and bordering states. Today, the 56th Annual Delta Exhibition has grown to encompass works in all media and is one of the most anticipated Arkansas Arts Center exhibitions of the year. It provides a unique snapshot of the artists from the Mississippi Delta region and a glimpse into the contemporary art scene.

      “The most soulful and honest works of art usually begin with a local footprint, a tether connecting many parts to one heat source, one place, in order to explore a broader panoply of ideas,” said guest juror Brian Rutenberg. “With over 1,300 images from 468 artists, this was certainly the most challenging exhibition I’ve ever juried.”

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    • Susan Paulsen: Wilmot

      June 27 — September 28, 2014

      The evocative visual poetry of Susan Paulsen: Wilmot comes to the Arkansas Arts Center in the form of more than 70 photographic prints and groupings of photographs that she took in Wilmot, Arkansas between 1995 and 2012. Most spectacularly, one large wall was covered by a grid of 90 photographs. Susan Paulsen: Wilmot was organized by Maison européenne de la photographie, Paris.

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    • Ties that Bind: Southern Art from the Collection

      January 14, 2014 — April 27, 2014

      Louis Guida

      W. C. Clay, Guitar On a Friend's

      Front Porch, Elaine

      1976

      gelatin silver print

      Arkansas Arts Center Foundation Collection:

      Gift of the Bicentennial Blues Project,

      University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, 1976.

      76.014.00a.15

      Artists of different races, cultural backgrounds and life experiences continually explore and help to shape our assumptions and understandings of Southern culture. Ties that Bind: Southern Art from the Collection featured work in a variety of media and made by twentieth-century Southern artists, many of whom were contemporaries of Arkansas artist, Carroll Cloar, or were heirs to his artistic legacy. Organized to complement the landmark retrospective exhibition about Carroll Cloar, Ties that Bind provided further context to his work and encourages viewers to compare and contrast it to that made by other Southern artists.

      Throughout his career, Cloar drew upon myriad sources for inspiration: friends and family, faith, folklore and the surrounding farmland, among others. In Arkansas Barley Fields, Cloar’s contemporary, Louis Freund, similarly depicted the fertile fields of the Delta, as did Henri Linton in Arkanscape #2. The rough and weathered textures of houses and buildings captured by Cloar appear in paintings by Virginia Purvis and Al Allen. Recalling childhood memories, Frances (“Grandma Fran”) Currey-Brown’s A Snowy Winter Day capture a unique sense of place, while Sister Gertrude Morgan’s Jesus I Love You evokes a religious fervor similar to that of Cloar’s The Baptising of Charlie Mae. The lyricism and musical influence in many of Cloar’s paintings—such as Where the Southern Cross the Yellow Dog—is captured first-hand in the photographs by Louis Guida and Cheryl Cohen, while the portrait photographs of Paul DeRigne and Mike Disfarmer portray personalities similar to those who occupied Cloar’s artistic world. Varied though the art is, there are countless currents of mood and memory. Viewers of the exhibition were invited to find their own ties that bind the works together.

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    • Earthly Delights: Modern and Contemporary Highlights from

      the Permanent Collection

      January 28, 2014 — April 20, 2014

      Ever since artists first painted the walls of the caves at Lascaux, France, humans have recorded their place on the Earth and attempted to make order of the beasts and other peoples that inhabit it. Earthly Delights contained highlights from the Arkansas Arts Center’s extensive collection of Modern and Contemporary art—including a number of recent acquisitions as well as works that had not been viewed in some time—that explored the theme. It featured such diverse works as a drawing of Adam and Eve by Fernando Botero (Colombian, born 1932) to an abstract monumental sculpture by Louise Nevelson (American, born Russia, 1899-1988), the more than thirty works displayed in the exhibition encourage visitors to find the connections between them and to ponder their own relation to the Earth and their surroundings.

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    • The Crossroads of Memory: Carroll Cloar and the American South

      February 28, 2014 — June 1, 2014

      The paintings of Carroll Cloar (1913-1993), rank among the most haunting and beautiful evocations ever made of the American South. Drawing upon family stories, photographs of ancestors, rural scenery, small town life, and memories of his childhood on an Arkansas farm, Cloar captured the quiet richness of a simpler world. At the same time, his images of abandoned buildings, wild panthers, or ghostly figures hint at the darker, more dangerous side of human existence. Many of Cloar’s works—such as Autumn Conversion or Where the Southern Cross the Yellow Dog—have an achingly familiar quality, suggesting our own family histories or childhood recollections.

      Cloar’s complex style pays homage not only to the great American Realist masters and the pointillism of the Post Impressionists, but blends these elements smoothly with the subtly disturbing images and themes of the Surrealists. His paintings, with their saturated colors, repeating patterns, and shallow picture planes, offer a unique and timeless vision of the American South. Marking the centenary of the artist’s birth, The Crossroads of Memory: Carroll Cloar and the American South included eighty paintings and five drawings, ranging from early Realist masterpieces to the poignant pictures of his later career.

      This exhibition was organized by the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art and the Arkansas Arts Center curated by Stanton Thomas, Curator of European and Decorative Art at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, the exhibition featured works from major public collections as well as rarely seen pictures still in private hands.

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    • Inciteful Clay

      April 4, 2014 — June 29, 2014

      InCiteful Clay offered an unparalleled overview of an emergent movement in contemporary ceramics dedicated to social commentary. Artists have long used their creations as powerful vehicles to confront society with major problems of the day, expanding from paintings, sculptures, prints, and photographs to installations and electronic media over the last century. Social concern had also become an area of increasing interest in contemporary craft.

      Incorporating a broad range of work, the selection of 27 ceramics looked at artists who have mustered an age-old medium to issue provocative critiques of current social and political inequities. The premise of the exhibition was organized around five themes: war and politics; the social and human condition; gender issues; environmental concerns; and popular and material culture. The artists conveyed their messages in styles that are aggressive, violent, disturbing, irreverent, and at times, humorous, but ever passionate. They relied on figurative imagery, narrative content, and a range of expressive avenues, including caricature, parody, satire, obscenity, erotica, and the grotesque.

      Featured artists in the exhibition included Akio Takemori, Toby Buonagurio, Nuala Creed, Michelle Erickson, Anne Potter, Ehren Tool, Richard Shaw, and Paula Winokur. Among the specific topics they addressed were the social consequences of war, the impact of declining moral values on children, capital punishment, consumerism, and global warming.

      Traditionally ceramics have served functional and decorative purposes and have been associated with positive experiences. Visitors to the exhibition came away with a new appreciation for the expressive capabilities of clay media to convey substantive content and to deliver the powerful critiques more routinely seen in painting and sculpture. They also discovered the distinctive avenues of expression associated with ceramics, arising from ironic adaptations of traditional forms and functions and the cultural meanings ceramics have acquired over time.

      Artist Bonnie Seeman departs from the standards of embellishment traditionally associated with functional ceramics in Untitled (bowl), where she juxtaposes botanical and anatomical images to convey the fragility and resiliency of life. Chad Curtis’s Cows uses sterile and homogenized materials to explore the ethics of the food production system, and Adrianne Crane’s eye-catching flower grenades in Artillery Field are a sinister representation of the destructive hand grenades used in war. InCiteful Clay affirmed the significant contribution of ceramics to contemporary art of social concern.

      InCiteful Clay was curated by Judith S. Schwartz, Ph.D., an internationally recognized specialist in contemporary ceramics. A professor and director of craft media in the Department of Art and Art Professions at New York University, Schwartz recently published a groundbreaking study on this movement in ceramic art titled Confrontational Ceramics: The Artist as Social Critic (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008). A Program of ExhibitsUSA, a national division of Mid-America Arts Alliance, with the Arkansas Arts Council and The National Endowment for the Arts.

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    • WOODWORKING INSTRUCTORS EXHIBITION

      March 14, 2014 — July 6, 2014

      From March 17 to July 6, visitors had an opportunity to view work made by the faculty of the Arkansas Arts Center Museum School’s Woodworking Department.

      The Woodshop, officially known as The Rick Hall Woodworking Studio, had been in existence for many years. The studio makes use of both hand tools and power saws, with safety being a focus of all classes taught. Whether you are brand new to woodworking, or you grew up watching a parent or grandparent make furniture or cabinetry in their shops at home, our woodworking classes offer something for students working at every skill level.

      Artwork from the Woodshop ranged in size from handheld pieces as small as wood-turned pens and bowls, to large full-sized bed frames with hand-carved details and coffee tables with intricate glass-inlayed surfaces. What else is made in the Woodshop? Rocking chairs, Adirondack chairs, dining room tables, night stands, sofa tables, wood boxes, jewelry work benches, cabinets, frames, flag display boxes, electric guitars, cutting boards, hand-carved Santa Clauses, and even a coffin! The Woodworking Instructors Exhibition displayed the type of work you can make in the Woodshop. Whether it is functional, decorative, and/or fine art, there is something for everyone in the Museum School’s Woodworking Department!

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    • 53rd Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition

      May 9, 2014 — July 27, 2014

      The Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition is one of the most popular exhibitions held at the Arts Center each year. The YAA showcases artwork by Arkansas students, kindergarten through 12th grade. More than 600 works in a wide variety of media are entered annually. Members of the Arkansas Art Educators Association jury the entries, selecting approximately 125 works for the exhibition. One "Best of Class" and two "Honorable Mentions" are selected for each grade by a guest juror. Each winner's school receives a monetary prize to help fund the arts program in his/her school. Selections from the Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition travel to schools and other venues in Arkansas as part of the Arts Center's State Services traveling exhibition program.

    • 2013

      • 50 Works 50 Weeks 50 Years

        January, 6 2013 — January 5, 2014

        The 50 Works 50 Weeks 50 Years exhibit celebrated the Arts Center's 50th anniversary by allowing staff member to choose their favorite works and having them displayed in the Atrium. A new work was installed every week for 50 weeks.

      • Museum School Faculty: Past and Present

        January 11, 2013 — March 10, 2013

        In conjunction with the Arkansas Arts Center's 50th Anniversary celebration, the Museum School Faculty Exhibition: Past and Present paid tribute to the Museum School faculty. The Arkansas Arts Center first began offering art classes for children and adults during the spring of 1960. When the new Arts Center was completed in May of 1963, it included studios that comprise the Museum School in which a full schedule of art classes was offered. The Museum School Faculty Exhibition: Past and Present highlighted work created by then current Museum School Faculty along with work from the permanent collection by former faculty members. Works in a variety of media were featured. This exhibition was the final installment in the series.

      • 55th Annual Delta Exhibition

        January 18, 2013 — March 10, 2013

        The Delta has is one of the most anticipated Arkansas Arts Center exhibitions of the year! Originally presented in 1958 as the Delta Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, this juried exhibition features innovative and provocative two and three- dimensional works in all media. Each year, more than 900 entries are received from artists who live in or were born in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee or Texas. A guest juror selects works for the exhibition and a Grand Award and two Delta Awards for the top works in the show. The Delta represents the dynamic vision of the artists of the Mississippi Delta region and offers visitors a glimpse into the contemporary art scene.

      • Wendy Maruyama: Executive Order 9066

        Feb. 1, 2013 — April 21, 2013

        This exhibition combined two projects of Wendy Maruyama, a studio furniture maker and head of the studio furniture program at San Diego State University. These projects, the Tag Project and Executive Order 9066, together told the story of the Japanese-American internment camps during World War II. In the Tag Project, Maruyama replicated 120,000 individual identification tags worn by the internees in the ten relocation camps, including two in Arkansas. Maruyama assembled the re-created paper tags in ten groups, each group representing all the internees at a specific camp. Each of these groupings hung from the gallery ceiling and were about 11 feet tall. Maruyama folded the Tag Project into a parallel project of hers titled Executive Order 9066 shown together in this exhibition. Executive Order 9066 was the directive signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordering the incarceration of all people of Japanese ancestry then resident in the United States. For the parallel project, Maruyama created work that explores ethnicity and identity through suitcases, footlockers and steamer trunks, artifacts from their owners' forced relocation journey in 1942.

        The Arts Center has collaborated with the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies and the Arkansas Center for History and Culture to organize Relics of Rohwer: Gaman and the Art of Perseverance, a related exhibition documenting the experiences and artwork of Japanese Americans at Rohwer, one of two internment camps located in Arkansas.The artwork is on loan from the Mabel Rose Jamison Vogel/Rosalie Santine Gould Collection, Butler Center for Arkansas Studies, Central Arkansas Library System.

        Organized by The Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston, MA

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      • Edward Weston: Leaves of Grass

        Feb. 1, 2013 — April 21, 2013

        As America awaited the declaration of war in the spring of 1941, photographer Edward Weston set out on a cross-country photographic expedition. Weston, one of America’s leading modernist photographers, was making photographs for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. The Limited Editions Club of New York commissioned these images to bring together the great nineteenth-century poet’s verbal celebration of America with the great twentieth-century photographer’s visual odyssey. Weston declined to literally illustrate Whitman’s words, yet the two portraits of America echo one another. Where Whitman’s nineteenth-century verse was shaped by the Civil War, Weston’s images anticipated World War II.

        Weston’s trip lasted almost ten months, covering 24 states and nearly 25,000 miles. Weston and his wife, Charis Wilson, drove their trusty Ford, “Walt,” throughout the South, the Mid-Atlantic, New England, and back home to California after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor brought about America’s entry into the war. Weston’s photographs include studies of decaying southern mansions, the Boulder Dam, a homely display of old bottles, the Grand Canyon, New Orleans cemeteries, and haunting portraits of people the photographer met along the way. Weston’s images form no detached national survey; rather they embody an idiosyncratic personal meditation on selected American places, objects, and people. Edward Weston: Leaves of Grass included 53 photographs chosen from the approximately 700 negatives Weston developed from the trip.

        Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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      • 52nd Annual Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition

        March 15, 2013 — April 28, 2013

        The Young Arkansas Artists exhibition is one of the most popular exhibitions held at the Arts Center. The YAA showcases artwork by Arkansas students, kindergarten through 12th grade. More than 600 works in a wide variety of media are entered annually. Members of the Arkansas Art Educators Association jury the entries, selecting approximately 125 works for the exhibition. One "Best of Class" and two "Honorable Mentions" are selected for each grade by a guest juror. Each winner's school receives a monetary prize to help fund the arts program in his/her school. Selections from the Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition travel to schools and other venues in Arkansas as part of the Arts Center's State Services traveling exhibition program.

      • Ron Meyers: A Potter’s Menagerie

        March 22, 2013 — May 5, 2013

        Rats, fish, goats, rabbits, frogs, chickens and more—these are the animals that adorn the wildly colorful and functional ceramics of Ron Meyers. With a career spanning nearly fifty years, Meyers is one of the most prolific American ceramics artists working today; and through his spontaneous and expressionistic designs has influenced generations of studio potters.

        Born and raised in Buffalo, New York, Meyers received his Bachelor of Science (1956) and Master of Science (1961) degrees in art education from Buffalo State University (SUNY-Buffalo) and his Master of Fine Arts (1967) degree in ceramics from the School for American Crafts, Rochester Institute of Technology. Upon graduating, Meyers served as the first instructor in ceramics at the University of South Carolina, Columbia (1967-1972) before moving to the University of Georgia, Athens, where he taught ceramics from 1972 until his retirement in 1993.

        Ron Meyers: A Potter’s Menagerie was the first comprehensive exhibition of the artist’s work and featured more than one hundred ceramics in a variety of forms—plates, platters, bowls, covered jars, yunomi (tea bowls)—as well as a selection of his rarely exhibited drawings. A full-color catalogue, published by the Arkansas Arts Center, accompanied the exhibition.

        Organized by the Arkansas Arts Center

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      • BAUHAUS TWENTY-21: AN ONGOING LEGACY - PHOTOGRAPHS BY GORDON WATKINSON

        May 24, 2013 — September 1, 2013

        This exhibition conveyeed the architectural history, design and enduring philosophies of the Bauhaus, a German expression meaning "house for building" and the name of an important German School principle of architecture and design. The exhibition offered a unique perspective on Bauhaus design philosophy as it relates to architecture and its relevance in today's society. The Bauhaus school was founded by Walter Gropius in 1919 and introduced principles that shaped the foundation of modern architecture. Conceived as a project encompassing architecture, design and photography, Bauhaus twenty-21 not only conveys the architectural history, but also illustrates the enduring philosophies of the Bauhaus. The exhibition was comprised of 77 photographs, plans and elevations and furniture that captured the essence of Bauhaus design and its influence on modern architecture and design.

        Organized by Foto+Synthesis Incorporated

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      • REMBRANDT, VAN DYCK, GAINSBOROUGH: THE TREASURES OF KENWOOD HOUSE, LONDON

        June 7, 2013 — September 8, 2013

        This special exhibition showcased 48 masterpieces from the collection known as the Iveagh Bequest. These magnificent paintings reside at Kenwood House, a neoclassical villa in London. The tour of Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough: The Treasures of Kenwood House, London provided a unique opportunity to view superb paintings outside the United Kingdom. Most of these paintings had never traveled to the United States before, and many of them have rarely been seen outside Kenwood. The highly acclaimed works represented the greatest artists of their periods, including Rembrandt van Rijn, Thomas Gainsborough, Anthony van Dyck, Frans Hals, Joshua Reynolds, J.M.W. Turner and more.

        Organized by the American Federation of Arts and English Heritage.

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      • INTERWOVEN: CRAFT

        June 18, 2013 — November 17, 2013

        Drawn from the collection of the Arkansas Arts Center, Interwoven: Craft featured work in a variety of forms and media—ceramic, glass, fiber and metal—by artists who employed the process of weaving in the manufacture of their work. While the exhibition contains a broad selection of baskets, they were not the sole focus of the installation. Rather, Interwoven: Craft also contained work by artists who explore the concept of interconnectedness as humans: our solitary and interpersonal relationships, those with the built and natural world, and those within and between cultures.

        Not limited to three-dimensional objects, this theme of interconnectedness was further explored through works-on paper-in the companion exhibition, Interwoven: Paper, in the Alice Pratt Brown Atrium. Similarly drawn from the Arts Center’s rich collection of drawings and prints, that exhibition contained work that explores the physical, emotional or spiritual. Figurative and abstract, mono- and polychromatic, large and small, images formed the warp and weft of this visual web. Some works represented harmonious relationships, while in others tangles arose.

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      • INTERWOVEN: Paper

        August 9, 2013 — November 17, 2013

        Drawn from the collection of the Arkansas Arts Center, Interwoven: Craft featured work in a variety of forms and media—ceramic, glass, fiber and metal—by artists who employed the process of weaving in the manufacture of their work. While the exhibition contains a broad selection of baskets, they were not the sole focus of the installation. Rather, Interwoven: Craft also contained work by artists who explore the concept of interconnectedness as humans: our solitary and interpersonal relationships, those with the built and natural world, and those within and between cultures.

        Not limited to three-dimensional objects, this theme of interconnectedness was further explored through works-on paper-in the companion exhibition, Interwoven: Paper, in the Alice Pratt Brown Atrium. Similarly drawn from the Arts Center’s rich collection of drawings and prints, that exhibition contained work that explores the physical, emotional or spiritual. Figurative and abstract, mono- and polychromatic, large and small, images formed the warp and weft of this visual web. Some works represented harmonious relationships, while in others tangles arose.

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      • Museum School Artist in Residence: Ryan Sniegocki, Ceramics

        July 2, 2013 — October 27 17, 2013

        This exhibition displayed the work of Museum School Pottery Department Artist-in-Residence, Ryan Sniegocki. A graduate of Catholic High and the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, Ryan began his residency with the Arkansas Arts Center in 2012 and continued his residency through 2014. He taught advanced pottery in the Arkansas Arts Center Museum School.

      • FACE TO FACE: ARTISTS' SELF-PORTRAITS FROM THE COLLECTION OF JACKYE AND CURTIS FINCH, JR.

        October 25 2013 — February 9, 2014

        This exhibition is organized by the Arkansas Arts Center and sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Merritt Dyke and Metropolitan National Bank. The surface quirks and deeper truths of the self emerge in the self-portrait, these were the subjects of the exhibition Face to Face. The artist invites the viewer to share what he or she has discovered in the mirror, and far more. Long-time Arkansas Arts Center supporters Jackye and Curtis Finch, Jr., are fascinated by these visual exposes. They are engaged in assembling one of America’s great collections of graphic self-portraiture, which they are gradually transferring to the Arkansas Arts Center. Their keen portrait collecting eyes search for works from across America and Europe, and throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From the walls of New York galleries to the back alleys of Budapest, the Finches find amazing revelations of individuals. Guest Curator Brad Cushman of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock assembled these striking self-images into pairs, encouraging contemplation of what unites and divides each pairing. In bringing the works together, he allows us to explore both what is universally human and what is utterly individual.

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      • Portraiture Now: Drawing on the Edge

        October 25 2013 — February 9, 2014

        From the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, in Washington, D.C., this exhibition focused on the intersection of contemporary drawing and portraiture. Drawings are traditionally admired for their directness, as the most immediate transcription – from eye to hand to paper – of an artist’s imagination. Over the then past two decades, however, contemporary artists had moved beyond the quick sketch, compositional study, and memory aid to embrace drawing with new enthusiasm and ambition. The six artists in this exhibition – Mequitta Ahuja, Mary Borgman, Adam Chapman, Ben Durham, Till Freiwald, and Rob Matthews – exemplified this trend with different approaches but the same energized commitment.

        The works in Drawing on the Edge expanded the narrow boundaries that once defined drawing. Probing the intersection between drawing, photography, painting, video, textual writing, and computer technology, artists introduce a sense of appealing complexity. They incorporate collage, manipulate scale, or experiment with surfaces such as frosted Mylar, handmade paper, or a manipulated computer screen. Despite the variety in size, style, and mood in these works, all six artists displayed a commitment to making direct, immediate, highly personal marks on paper. Each of them employ a painstaking technique; their meticulous, repetitive actions result in a contemplative, almost meditative, engagement with process that adds a psychological depth to their work.

        This exhibition was organized by the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

        This exhibition and its programming were made possible through the Rebecca Houser Westcott Fund for Portraiture Now; the Abraham and Virginia Weiss Charitable Trust, Amy and Marc Meadows; and the Paul M. and Christine G. Wick Fund. The tour to Arkansas was supported by The Stella Boyle Smith Trust.

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      • MARK ROTHKO IN THE 1940S: THE DECISIVE DECADE

        October 25, 2013 — February 9, 2014

        The 1940s was a decade of tremendous change for the world, for Western art, for New York City’s place in the art world and for Mark Rothko (1903-1970). The most important result was the formation of what became known as The New York School, a collection of artists working in a nexus of artistic approaches, the best known of which were Gesturalism, or Abstract Expressionism and Color Field. What most members of this group shared was a faith in the power of art effectively to address the pressing historical problems of their era writ large in the movies, news reports, and photographs of the war and its uncertain aftermath.

        One of the major members of the New York School was Mark Rothko, the most important of the School’s Color Field wing. For Rothko, like many of his colleagues, the 1940s was the critical decade for his development. Mark Rothko in the 1940s is an examination into the artistic maturation—a decade of searching and rapid evolution-- of one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century that deserves not only closer attention but also a re-evaluation.

        Mark Rothko in the 1940s was the first exhibition and catalogue to reevaluate this work in the context of Rothko’s thoughts about art from the period. Mark Rothko in the 1940s brought to light many works not seen before by scholars or the public and highlight a period of his career that was often overlooked.

        Mark Rothko in the 1940s: The Decisive Decade was organized by the Arkansas Arts Center, the Columbia Museum of art, the Columbus Museum of Art and the Denver Art Museum, in conjunction with the National Gallery of Art, Washington. The exhibition was funded in part by the Dedalus Foundation and was supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

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      • THE PEOPLE THERE: PAINTINGS BY EMILY MOLL WOOD

        November 5, 2013 — February 23, 2014

        Emily Wood earned a Master of Arts degree inpainting at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock in 2011 and a BA in art from Ouachita Baptist University in 2004. She has also studied painting at the Art Students' League of New York. After being trained to paint in oils, she started painting in acrylics while living and painting in a tiny New York City apartment. Emily taught art for the Little Rock School District, the Chair of the Painting and Drawing Department at the Arkansas Arts Center, has been a painting and drawing instructor at the Museum School since 2008. Emily has been accepted into and won awards in juried exhibitions throughout the South, and her work can be found in public and private collections across the United States. Through her work, Emily says, “I hope to communicate not only a sense of place through people but universal qualities of humanity and connectivity. The application of paint, or in some cases the absence of paint, is used as part of the narrative of my work.”

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      • 2012

        • 44th Collector’s Show/Sale

          November 30, 2012 — December 30, 2012

          Every year, the Arkansas Arts Center holds the Collectors Show & Sale, a favorite of visitors. This annual tradition brings a taste of the New York gallery scene to Little Rock. The show encourages local collecting by presenting a variety of works on paper in all media from more than 20 New York galleries.

        • 38th Toys Designed by Artists

          November 21, 2012 — January 6, 2013

          The Toys Designed By Artists exhibition engages museum visitors, delighting young and old alike. In 1973, the Arkansas Arts Center initiated an exhibition of toys designed by artists. Inspired by Alexander Calder's circus figures of the late 1920s and early 1930s, this exhibition was launched to stimulate the imagination of both children and adults and to engage them with toys of whimsy, delight and good craftsmanship. The tradition continued with the 38th Toys Designed by Artists. This international juried exhibition challenged artists to take the concept of "toy" and make a personal expression - a piece of art. The wildly inventive toys selected often hearken back to the days before plastic and mass production, when all toys were handmade and, whether simple or elaborate, engaged the imagination of both maker and user.

          Organized by the Arkansas Arts Center

        • Formed from Fire: American Studio Glass from the Permanent Collection

          September 4, 2012 — November 4, 2012

          This exhibition of 30 works commemorated the 50th anniversary of the founding of the American studio glass movement. Glass techniques included free-blown, mold-blown, cased, hot-worked, cut, cast, polished and layered by artists such as Harvey Littleton, Dale Chihuly, Beth Lipman, Tim Tate and Sonja Blomdahl are included.

        • 50 For Arkansas

          September 21, 2012 — January 6, 2013

          Dorothy and Herbert Vogel are avid collectors of contemporary art and are well known throughout the New York art scene. Their world-class art collection began in a one-bedroom New York apartment while they lived on Dorothy’s income as a librarian and dedicated Herbert’s income as a postal worker to the acquisition of art. Their collection steadily grew to more than 4,000 pieces. In 2008, the Vogels launched a nation-wide gifts program titled The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States with the help of the National Gallery of Art, the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The Vogels distributed 2,500 works from their collection throughout the nation, with 50 works going to a selected art institution in each of the 50 states. Consisting largely of works on paper, the Arkansas Arts Center was selected to receive the works for the state of Arkansas. This exhibition featured the works from this gift. Artists included William Anastasi, Will Barnet, Michael Goldberg, Michael Lucero, Betty Parsons, Richard Tuttle and more. This exhibition was a joined initiative of the Trustees of the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection and the National Gallery of Art, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

        • Multiplicity

          September 21, 2012 — January 6, 2012

          The concept of making multiple images from the same matrix has been integral to printmaking since the earliest prints were pulled from woodblocks and metal plates in the 15th century. Multiplicity brought together a selection of prints by artists for whom the concept of multiplicity in its many forms provides a touchstone for their artistic expression. Many of the artists in the exhibition expanded the idea of multiplicity beyond editions of identical impressions by creating series, sequences and images that comprise numerous parts. The exhibition featured 83 works from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's permanent collection by contemporary artists such as Vija Celmins, Chuck Close, Richard Estes, David Hockney, Sol LeWitt, Kiki Smith and Kara Walker.

          Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum with support from the William R. Kenan, Jr. Endowment Fund. The C.F. Foundation in Atlanta supports the museum’s traveling exhibition program, Treasures to Go.

        • Building the Collection: Art Acquired in the 2000s

          September 7, 2012 — November 11, 2012

          In recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the Arkansas Arts Center, the Building the Collection series of exhibitions was created to celebrate the chronological growth of the permanent collection. Building the Collection: Art Acquired in the 2000s was the final installation in the Building the Collection series. This exhibition took a focused look at a broad selection of works acquired for the collection during that time period. 3,649 works were added to the collection including ceramic, fiber, glass, metal, mixed media, wood, drawing, painting, photography, print and sculpture.

        • Tattoo Witness: Photographs by Mark Perrott

          June 22, 2012 — September 9, 2012

          The large-scale black and white photographs in this exhibition documented 25 years of tattoo culture. In 1979, Pittsburgh photographer Mark Perrott spent weekends making black and white portraits at Nick's Island Avenue Tattoo parlor in McKees Rocks, Pa. Later, he took his camera on a rust belt tour of tattoo parlors where he made more photographs. His continued curiosity compelled him to visit 10 American mid-career tattoo masters where he made portraits of each artist and a handful of their clients. In this exhibition, Perrott's stark photographs presented the viewer with a clear-focused image of individuals who have stories to tell. The artistry of the tattoos and the photographs came together to offer a unique look at one of the oldest subjects in art-capturing a true likeness of an individual. In these portraits of both the tattoos and their owners, Perrott investigated the very personal and public nature of tattoos. The exhibition also challenges visitors to question who gets tattoos and why people have found the need to mark their bodies for more than 5000 years.

          Organized and toured by the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Greensburg, PA

        • The Rockefeller Influence

          May 25, 2012 — August 19, 2012

          The Arkansas Arts Center commemorated the centennial of Winthrop Rockefeller's birth with the exhibition "The Rockefeller Influence." This exhibition included works that have come into the permanent collection as a result of the Rockefeller family. It also told the story of the major role Winthrop Rockefeller, his wife Jeannette and members of the Rockefeller family had in the creation and development of the Arkansas Arts Center and its programs. This exhibition was part of a region-wide celebration of this important anniversary.

          Organized by the Arkansas Arts Center for the Winthrop Rockefeller Centennial

        • 11th National Drawing Invitational: New York, Singular Drawings

          April 20, 2012 — September 9, 2012

          The 11th National Drawing Invitational: New York, Singular Drawings brought back one of the Arkansas Arts Center signature exhibitions. This version focused on the work of ten contemporary artists in New York City. The works by these artists illuminated the rich and ever expanding definition of drawing. They attest to the will to experiment and to widen the established understanding of what constitutes the medium. The flexibility of paper allows for the use of creative energy that could border on the obsessive. The monumental scale of many works defies the fragility of the material; the density of lines becomes a physical challenge to the artist’s hand. The sources of inspiration and the depth of investigation often delve into issues of psychology, science and history.

        • 51st Annual Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition

          April 20, 2012 — May 27, 2012

          Showcasing artworks in all media created by young artists from Kindergarten through 12th grade throughout Arkansas. Entries come from schools and art programs both public and private. Art instructors across the state submitted 667 artworks for consideration from 192 schools and art programs in 2011. Members of the Arkansas Arts Educators Association were invited to jury the submissions. They selected 117 artworks representing 65 schools and programs. Amanda Linn, juror.

        • Mind’s Eye: Still-lifes of G. Daniel Massad

          April 13, 2012 — June 10, 2012

          Dan Massad's extraordinary works in pastel are filled with layers of meaning. In each of these works, Massad has created a small world built of objects that at first glance appear to be common still life items. On closer examination one realizes the compositions and elements of the pieces carry references to such ideas as the Golden Ratio, the geometric proportion behind all aesthetically pleasing art. Each piece is a beautifully created still life on a dark near-black atmospheric background of layers and layers of pastel on which Massad works until the moment only he knows the work is complete.

          Organized by the Arkansas Arts Center

        • The New Materiality: Digital Dialogues at the Boundaries of Contemporary Craft

          April 13, 2012 — August 5, 2012

          This exhibition explored the growing use of digital technologies as a means of expression in craft in the United States. Curator Fo Wilson selected approximately 30 innovative works by craft artists who use digital technologies, not to replace traditional workmanship of the hand, but to "materialize" and incorporate digital media in their work as a medium to be "exploited, manipulated and appropriated in creative ways." The internet, Smart phones and laptops are part of our daily lives and digital media is an important part of today's material culture. New and interesting questions about what craft is and what it can be arise from considering those questions and through the examination of the work in "The New Materiality."

          Organized by the Fuller Craft Museum, Brockton, MA, Fo Wilson-Curator

        • Building the Collection: Art Acquired in the 1990s

          February 10, 2012 — May 13, 2012

          In recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the Arkansas Arts Center, the Building the Collection series of exhibitions was created to celebrate the chronological growth of the permanent collection. This Building the Collection installation takes a focused look at specific Arkansas Arts Center acquisitions brought into the collection during the 1990s.

        • Masters of American Watercolors

          January 27, 2012 — March 28, 2012

          This exhibition celebrated the watercolor medium as practiced by American artists. Featuring work from the Arkansas Arts Center permanent collection, the show included the artists Alexander Calder, William Dunlap, Betty Parsons, Philip Pearlstein, Joseph Stella, Dorthea Tanning and Abraham Walkowitz. The exhibition explored the breadth of the watercolor medium from the late 19th century to the present. The works displayed a variety of content from landscape to abstraction in watercolor, gouache and tempera on paper.

        • 54th Annual Delta Exhibition

          January 27, 2012 — March 28, 2012

          The annual Delta Exhibition showcases work by artists from Arkansas and its bordering states. This juried exhibition presents innovative and provocative works in all media and showcases current trends in art. Columbus Museum Executive Director Tom Butler served as juror. Butler's curatorial interests include American art, drawings and photography. Butler has organized over 100 exhibitions of paintings, sculpture, graphics and contemporary crafts. He authored the catalog Lines of Discovery: 225 Years of American Drawing for a touring exhibition presented at the Arkansas Arts Center in 2007.

        • Horizons Interrupted

          January 13, 2012 — March 25, 2012

          Arkansas artist Norwood Creech of Lepanto purchased the Tabriz auction item "Curator-for-a-Day." Working with Arts Center curator Joseph Lampo and Chief Preparator Keith Melton, Creech thoughtfully selected a group of works in which the horizon line is a critical element of the composition. Creech found that this element transfers to other genres, including still-life and abstraction. Whether high or low, for Creech the line in these works provided an important grounding spatial reference.

        • 2011

          • 43rd Collector’s Show & Sale

            December 2, 2011 — December 31, 2011

            An annual tradition at the Arkansas Arts Center for over forty years, this exhibition brings a taste of the New York gallery scene to Little Rock. The show is organized to encourage local collecting by presenting a variety of works on paper in all media from more than 20 New York galleries. All works are selected by the Arkansas Arts Center Director and Curators.

          • Building the Collection: Lino Tagliapietra

            October 28, 2011 — January 29, 2012

            This installation unveiled the recent acquisition Red Dinosaur, 2006, by Lino Tagliapietra. It is a beautiful 55-inch tall glass piece, which was acquired in 2010. Red Dinosaur was be on view in the Winthrop Rockefeller Foyer. The Winthrop Rockefeller Gallery exhibited works from the Arkansas Arts Center Foundation collection that have color and form as important elements in their creation.

          • Cast, Cut, Forged, and Crushed: Selections in Metal From the Robyn and John Horn Collection

            October 7, 2011 — January 15, 2012

            This exhibition of works in metal, selected from the John and Robyn Horn Collection, reflected the experienced eye of these collectors. Acquired over the past 20 years, works by over two dozen metal artists reveal the importance of technique and in making metal objects. Featured artists include Elizabeth Brim, Hoss Haley, Tom Joyce, Albert Paley, Rick Smith and others

          • Will Barnet at the Arkansas Arts Center: A Centennial Exhibition

            October 7, 2011 — January 15, 2012

            In celebration of New York artist Will Barnet’s 100th birthday, the Arkansas Arts Center presented a special exhibition Will Barnet at the Arkansas Arts Center: A Centennial Exhibition. This exhibition will displayed a vast array of works by Will Barnet from the Arkansas Arts Center collection.

            Will Barnett has experienced and absorbed all the major art movements in American Modern art. Will Barnet was an influential artist in negotiating a transition from figural art to abstraction in the '40s and '50s. He was also a teacher at the Art Students League in New York, who influenced a number of America's most original modern artists such as Jasper Johns. The Arts Center will display more than 75 drawings given to the AAC by the artist in honor of his long-time friendship with former director Townsend Wolfe

          • Museum School Faculty Exhibition: Past and Present

            September 16, 2011 — November 13, 2011

            As part of the continuation of the celebration of the Arkansas Arts Center’s 50th anniversary, this exhibition acknowledged the importance of art instruction in the Museum School. The exhibition was the second in a three-year series highlighting work from the permanent collection created by former Museum School Faculty along with recent works made by current Faculty members. The Arts Center had its first classes for children and adults during the spring of 1960. In 1963 when the newly constructed building opened, a faculty of 13 professional artists offered 32 different classes and had an enrollment of 300 students. In 2011, Museum School had a faculty of over 50 professional artists and offers over 80 classes to over 600 students each quarter.

          • In Search of Norman Rockwell’s America

            July 29, 2011 — September 18, 2011

            In Search of Norman Rockwell’s America was a groundbreaking exhibition that pairs the work of American icon Norman Rockwell with images by award-winning photojournalist Kevin Rivoli. This exhibition featured a selection of black and white photographs alongside original Rockwell paintings, drawings and lithographs of similar imagery, forming a captivating comparison exhibition. Included in the exhibition wass the never-before-published painting The Golfer, a rare subject for Rockwell and one of his earlier works.

            Exhibition organized by Kevin and Michele Rivoli in collaboration with International Arts & Artists, Washington, D.C.

          • Building the Collection: Art Acquired in the1980s

            July 15, 2011 — October 9, 2011

            In recognition of the 50th Anniversary of the Arkansas Arts Center, the Building the Collection series of exhibitions was created to celebrate the chronological growth of the permanent collection. This Building the Collection installation took a focused look at specific Arkansas Arts Center acquisitions brought into the collection during the 1980s

          • A Couple of Ways of Doing Something, Photographs by Chuck Close, poems by Bob Holman

            April 29, 2011 — June 26, 2011

            Aperture, a not-for-profit organization devoted to photography and the visual arts, organized this traveling exhibition and produced the accompanying publication. This project was made possible through the generous support of Lannan Foundation and Carey C. Shuart. This exhibition features Chuck Close’s delicately intimate daguerreotypes, large scale Jacquard tapestries and digital pigment prints paired with Bob Holman’s witty and beautifully typeset poems. The collected work was a transfixing group portrait of Close’s influential and highly creative circle of friends as well as an exploration of challenging photographic mediums.

            Organized by Aperture Foundation, New York through the generous support of Lannan Foundation and Carey C. Shuart.

          • The Impressionists and Their Influence

            April 1, 2011 — June26, 2011

            In late 19th century Paris, a group of artists broke from long-standing tradition when they moved outdoors to paint. These artists, the Impressionists, captured the world around them in new ways creating colorful, light-filled scenes of carefree summer outings, riverbanks and seashores, private gardens, public parks, dance halls, cafés and the people who inhabited them. This exhibition brought together beautiful master paintings and intimate works on paper by French artists such as Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas, Camille Pissarro, as well as works by major Post-Impressionist artists Pierre Bonnard, Édouard Vuillard, Paul Signac and more. In addition, the show featured works by American artists, such as Mary Cassatt, Childe Hassam, and Theodore Robinson, who fell full sway under the influence of the Impressionists. Featuring more than 100 works from the collections of the renowned High Museum of Art, the Arkansas Arts Center and private collections, The Impressionists and Their Influence was a unique opportunity to explore the movement that became Impressionism.

            Organized by the High Museum of Art, Atlanta and the Arkansas Arts Center.

          • Michael Peterson: Evolution/Revolution

            March 18, 2011 — July 3, 2011

            This exhibition was the first comprehensive look at Michael Peterson’s poetic wood sculpture, much of which was inspired by the craggy skies and misty rains of the Pacific Northwest. Following the unique trajectory of this wood sculptor over the past 20 years, the exhibition traced the evolution from the artist’s early works heavily dictated by the lathe to his current, revolutionary sculptures not lathe-formed. More than 30 sculptures were on view.

            Organized by the Bellevue Arts Museum. Made possible through the generous support of the Windgate Charitable Foundation. Additional support provided by the Institute of Library and Museum Services. Co-curated by Michael Monroe and Stefano Catalani.

          • 50th Annual Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition

            March 15, 2011 — April 17, 2011

            The Arkansas Art Center is proud to bring you the 50th year of the Young Arkansas Artists Annual Exhibition, an exhibition by young people all across Arkansas. The art of young people today fills a great need in society. It exemplifies a flourishing of ideas and expression. In 1961, the Arkansas Arts Center hosted the first statewide Young Arkansas Artists Exhibition hoping to ensure learning, inspiration and creative expression. Fifty years later the exhibition has grown to be an Arkansan tradition. YAA is a celebration of the creative achievements of young Arkansan artists, but it is also a celebration of the youthful spirit of all Arkansans.

          • Museum School Faculty Exhibition: Past and Present

            January 11, 2011 — February 27, 2011

            In conjunction with the Arkansas Arts Center 50th Anniversary celebration, the Museum School Faculty: Past and Present paid tribute to the Museum School faculty. The Arkansas Arts Center first began offering art classes for children and adults during the spring of 1960. When the new Arts Center was completed in May of 1963, it included studios that comprise the Museum School in which a full schedule of art classes was offered. The Museum School Faculty: Past and Present highlights work created by current Museum School Faculty along with work from the permanent collection by former faculty members. Works in a variety of media were featured.

          • 2010

            • 53rd Annual Delta Exhibition

              December 17, 2010 — February 20, 2011

              The Annual Delta Exhibition showcases contemporary works by artists from Arkansas and the six bordering states. This juried exhibition encompasses works in all media and reflects the region’s strong traditions of craftsmanship and observation. The Delta offers a snapshot of contemporary art in the Mid-South.

            • 37th Toys Designed by Artists Exhibition

              December 17, 2010 — February 20, 2011

              An international competition for artists, the biennial exhibition showcased a variety of original and innovative designs to celebrate the playful side of artists and viewers alike.Jim Bartz, a past winner of Toys Designed by Artist, juried the 37th exhibition. Bartz is a wood artist that combines wood carving with toys, music and Americana. More than 140 pieces were submitted for the show and 40 were selected for the exhibition. Two works were selected to become part of the Arkansas Arts Center Foundation collection. Ye Seul Seo’s Please, Soothe Me and Bill Price’s Sheriff Rubber Ducky were given Purchase Awards.

            • Building the Collection: How it Began

              December 10, 2010 — February 27, 2011

              Building the Collection: How it Began was a look at the beginnings of the works on paper collection starting with the first 3 major purchases of the 1970s: Graves, Wyeth, and de Kooning.

            • 42nd Collector’s Show & Sale

              December 3, 2010 — January 2, 2011

              The Collectors Show & Sale is an annual Arkansas Arts Center tradition that brings the New York Gallery scene to Little Rock. Interim Director Joseph Lampo visited more than 20 New York galleries and hand selected works for the exhibition. The exhibition included works in a variety of media that range from 19th century masterworks to contemporary pieces by emerging artists. All works were for sale and vary in price. The unique and varied selection of works allows seasoned buyers to add to their collections, while introducing potential new collectors to the field. The 42nd Collectors Show & Sale showcased works by Roy DeForest, Morris Graves, Milton Avery, William Bailey, Rackstraw Downes, Gregory Gillespie, Carolyn Brady, Viola Frey, Romare Bearden, Adolph Menzel, Édouard Vuillard, Jane Hammond, Nancy Spero, Willem de Kooning, Wifredo Lam, Marguerite Thompson Zorach and more.

            • Building the Collection: Shigemasa Higashida

              September 15, 2010 — November 21, 2010

              The large platter by Shigemasa Higashida presented in this focused installation allows us to consider traditional Japanese ceramic techniques brought modern as well as landscape as an artist’s subject matter. This piece along with the works and three-dimensional objects in the Strauss Gallery show how artists since the 17th century have used the full potential of their media to express ideas about the landscape genre.

            • A Century of Revolution: Mexican Art Since 1910

              September 1, 2010 — November 21, 2010

              The 1910 Revolution in Mexico was the starting point in a series of struggles that brought political and social change. Each turning point in the conflict prompted a flurry of artistic creativity. A Century of Revolution illustrated these visions for revolution through the renowned collections of Mexican art housed at the University of Texas, Austin and private collections. This exhibition is divided into four themes – Revolutions in Form, Theaters of Revolution, Student Revolutions and Revolutionary Identities. Featured artists include Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco, José Guadalupe Posada, Arnold Belkin, José Luis Cuevas, Rocio Maldonado and more.

              Organized by the Arkansas Arts Center

            • Bigger, Better, More: The Art of Viola Frey

              August 20, 2010 — November 28, 2010

              Bigger, Better, More was the first major exhibition of ceramicist Viola Frey’s works since her death in 2004. Frey is most renowned for her large-scale monumental figures. In this show, the large colossal ceramic sculptures greet viewers head on with arms outstretched and looking directly into visitors’ eyes. Frey’s paintings, plates and drawings are also on view. Frey’s work is influenced by her family, especially her grandmothers and mother, artists Mark Rothko, Henri Matisse and Andy Warhol.

              Organized by the Gardiner Museum, Toronto, Ontario, Canada and the Racine Art Museum Townsend Wolfe Gallery & Jeannette Edris Rockefeller Gallery

            • Degrees of Density

              July 2, 2010 — August 22, 2010

              The Kentler International Drawing Space, located in Brooklyn, N.Y., is dedicated to contemporary drawings and works on paper. Each year, the Kentler invites a curator to select a show from its drawing flatfiles. In 2010, Marilyn Symmes of the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University is the curator of Degrees of Density: Selections from the Flatfiles of the Kentler International Drawing Space. Symmes selected 54 contemporary drawings that prompt insights about what is possible in drawing and about fundamental aspects of nature. Because of space limitations, the Arkansas Arts Center mounted some of the drawings on the gallery walls and present the rest of the works in a flatfile storage system. Half way through the show the Arkansas Arts Center switched the works on the walls with those in the flatfile drawers.

              Selections from the Flatfiles of the Kentler International Drawing Space. Organized by the Kentler International Drawing Space, Brooklyn, New York.

            • The Miniature Worlds of Bruce Metcalf

              May 28, 2010 — August 22, 2010

              The Miniature Worlds of Bruce Metcalf was the first major exhibition and catalogue focused solely on the artist’s truly engaging and spirited work. Born in 1949, Bruce Metcalf has long been revered as a leading art jeweler, curator and critic of contemporary craft and essayist. This exhibition examined social, moral and political issues, many of which Metcalf has also raised in his essays. Curated by Signe Mayfield, curator at the Palo Alto Art Center, this exhibition featured 70 pieces dating from the 1970s to the present, loaned from the collections of the artist, museums and private lenders across the country. Cast in silver or carved in wood, Metcalf's vulnerable protagonists acted out issues on the stage of miniature worlds. In their dual life as wearable brooches, they venture into the world, where they engage the unsuspecting viewer with their stories and distinctive visual language.

              Organized by the Palo Alto Art Center, Division of Arts and Sciences, City of Palo Alto, California. This exhibition has been made possible through the support of the Palo Alto Art Center Foundation; Rotasa Foundation, Windgate Charitable Foundation, the Arts Council Silicon Valley; and private contributions.

            • Young Arkansas Artists 49th Annual Exhibition

              April 9, 2010 — May 23, 2010

              Organized by the Arkansas Arts Center with the cooperation of the Arkansas Department of Education, the Young Arkansas Artists exhibition showcases artworks of all media created by students in kindergarten through 12th grade in Arkansas schools- both public and private. Awards for the Young Arkansas Artists 49th Annual Exhibition were selected by Win Bruhl, who has taught printmaking and drawing at four universities since 1970. He was chairman of the Department of Art at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Bruhl studied art and art education at Southeast Missouri State and has a Master of Fine Arts in printmaking from Montana State University. Bruhl selected one “Best of Class” and two “Honorable Mention” awards for each grade level. Monetary awards, funded by Arkansas Children’s Hospital, are given to each winner’s school to support the funding of art programs.

            • Capturing the Orient

              MApril 2, 2010 — May 16, 2010

              This exhibition of works from regional private collections extended the exploration of Orientalism begun earlier that year in the focus installation from the Arts Center collections, Exotic Lands: Europe Imagines Egypt and the East. In the 19th century, artists, such as Scottish painter David Roberts, travelled in search of exotic or impressive subjects and recorded them in sketches and quick painting studies.

              Roberts visited Spain and Morocco in the early 1830s before sailing for Egypt in August 1838. His extended tour included Egypt, Nubia, the Sinai, the Holy Land, Jordan and Lebanon. Upon his return to Britain, Roberts used the resulting sketches and watercolors as the basis for 247 lithographs, originally published in parts and later bound into six volumes. Roberts’ views of monuments and temples, such as the Great Hall at Karnac, Thebes (Luxor) and the interior of the Temple at Abu Simble, show these impressive ancient architectural marvels just as he experienced them, partially buried in sand.

              Organized by the Arkansas Arts Center

            • 52nd Annual Delta Exhibition

              January 29, 2010 — March 14, 2010

              Juror Martha Tedeschi, curator in the Department of Prints and Drawings at the Art Institute of Chicago, chose 51 works for the exhibition and selected the Grand Award, Delta Awards and Honorable Mentions. The Delta Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture was founded in 1956 to feature contemporary work by artists from Arkansas and bordering states. The annual Delta Exhibition grew to encompass works in all media and is a showcase for the dynamic vision of artists of the Mississippi Delta region. The diversity of art reflects the region’s strong traditions of craftsmanship and observation, combined with innovative use of materials and an experimental approach to subject matter. The Grand Award was awarded to Kyle Chaput of Corpus Christi, Texas, for his lithograph titled Oso Bay Site 47. Kathy Bay of Sherwood received a Delta Award for her work Txtrd Msg, acrylic and collage on paper. Kat Wilson of Ft. Smith also received a Delta Award for Artist: Rudy, Arkansas, a digital print.

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